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Kazuki Mizuguchi Artist in Hotel
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The 14th room Artist Room on the theme of "Castle", which was started by artist Kazuki Mizuguchi on March 4, 2015, and after he stayed at the hotel and commuted to and from it for 454 days (*), was finally completed on May 31, 2016 as the 21st Artist Room.

Mizuguchi says: "I wanted to paint a different world that transcends time in a special space". Before starting the work, he visited castles all over Japan. Initially, he planned to represent roof tiles shining in a blue sky with verdigris, but while he was working during his stay at the hotel, his vision began to change, and he wanted to re-do it differently. Discussions between the hotel team and the artist ensued. He painted over what had been the walls up to July, and then painted Edo Castle, which had been lost in the fire, in white lines on a black background.

When you pass through the entrance to the room, which mimics a stone wall, you see a towering castle with a golden killer whale painted on the wall above the headboard. The castle walls and moat surround the bed, and on the opposite wall, a large room that would have welcomed various clan lords is expressed in gold leaf. Another highlight is night in this room. When the curtains are opened at night, the room interior is reflected in the glass, so that when you gaze in the direction of the Imperial Palace, the castle appears.
We hope that in the Artist Room Castle, you will enjoy the exquisite beauty and the history of Japan.

*Production period was 454 days, but there were days off during the period.

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Artist in Hotel Shiodome
水口和紀
Artist in Hotel 汐留

After Edo Castle was built by Dokan Ota in the 3rd year of the Koushou era (1457), it was transformed into Japan's largest castle with a vast territory by the Tokugawa family. Among its structures, the third castle tower which was completed in the 15th year of Kanei era (1638), was the largest wooden building at that time. Unfortunately destroyed by the Great Fire in the 3rd year of the Meireki era (1657), it was never subsequently rebuilt.

I'm sure that those who visit this room will feel the majesty of this castle from the Edo era. When you open the curtains at night and gaze in the direction of Edo Castle (the Imperial Palace), a reflected image of Edo Castle appears on the widow.  In time, all things which once flourished will fade away, and their forms will disappear.  Is the scenery in front of your eyes a reality or just an illusion, is it just a fleeting phenomenon like a shimmering heat haze?  I love this transient view of the world.

Kazuki Mizuguchi